vladibo666: (Default)
1. Пошлость
Русско-американский писатель Владимир Набоков, читавший лекции по славянским исследованиям студентам в Америке, признался, что не мог перевести это слово, которое каждый русский легко понимает....

Полностью читать здесь www.rbth.com/education/2017/05/29/10-russian-words-impossible-to-translate-into-english_772132

С
орри, статья написана по-аглицки.
vladibo666: (Default)
 English Signs from Around the World

In a Bangkok temple: IT IS FORBIDDEN TO ENTER A WOMAN, EVEN A FOREIGNER, IF DRESSED AS A MAN.

Cocktail lounge, Norway: LADIES ARE REQUESTED NOT TO HAVE CHILDREN IN THE BAR.

Doctors office, Rome: SPECIALIST IN WOMEN AND OTHER DISEASES.

Dry cleaners, Bangkok: DROP YOUR TROUSERS HERE FOR THE BEST RESULTS.

In a Nairobi restaurant: CUSTOMERS WHO FIND OUR WAITRESSES RUDE OUGHT TO SEE THE MANAGER.

On the main road to Mombasa, leaving Nairobi: TAKE NOTICE: WHEN THIS SIGN IS UNDER WATER, THIS ROAD IS IMPASSABLE.

On a poster at Kencom: ARE YOU AN ADULT THAT CANNOT READ? IF SO WE CAN HELP.

In a City restaurant: OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK AND WEEKENDS.

In a cemetery: PERSONS ARE PROHIBITED FROM PICKING FLOWERS FROM ANY BUT THEIR OWN GRAVES.

Tokyo hotel's rules and regulations: GUESTS ARE REQUESTED NOT TO SMOKE OR DO OTHER DISGUSTING BEHAVIORS IN BED.

On the menu of a Swiss restaurant: OUR WINES LEAVE YOU NOTHING TO HOPE FOR.

In a Tokyo bar: SPECIAL COCKTAILS FOR THE LADIES WITH NUTS.

Hotel, Yugoslavia: THE FLATTENING OF UNDERWEAR WITH PLEASURE IS THE JOB OF THE CHAMBERMAID.

Hotel, Japan: YOU ARE INVITED TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE CHAMBERMAID.

In the lobby of a Moscow hotel across from a Russian Orthodox monastery: YOU ARE WELCOME TO VISIT THE CEMETERY WHERE FAMOUS RUSSIAN AND SOVIET COMPOSERS, ARTISTS AND WRITERS ARE BURIED DAILY EXCEPT THURSDAY.

A sign posted in Germany's Black Forest: IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN ON OUR BLACK FOREST CAMPING SITE THAT PEOPLE OF DIFFERENT SEX, FOR INSTANCE, MEN AND WOMEN, LIVE TOGETHER IN ONE TENT UNLESS THEY ARE MARRIED WITH EACH OTHER FOR THIS PURPOSE.

Hotel, Zurich: BECAUSE OF THE IMPROPRIETY OF ENTERTAINING GUESTS OF THE OPPOSITE SEX IN THE BEDROOM, IT IS SUGGESTED THAT THE LOBBY BE USED FOR THIS PURPOSE.

Advertisement for donkey rides, Thailand: WOULD YOU LIKE TO RIDE ON YOUR OWN ASS?

Airline ticket office, Copenhagen: WE TAKE YOUR BAGS AND SEND THEM IN ALL DIRECTIONS.

A laundry in Rome: LADIES, LEAVE YOUR CLOTHES HERE AND SPEND THE AFTERNOON HAVING A GOOD TIME.

vladibo666: (Default)
"Этот парень очень здорово изображает 24 акцента! Говорю это как человек, который жил в студенческой общаге в Шотландии с китаянками, индусами, итальянкой и нигерийцем:) Досмотрите до русского акцента (5:13) - похоже или нет?  Больше интересных видео на English with Nick  " 

Видео   www.facebook.com/engskype/videos/1628128884181456/
vladibo666: (Default)
 INVARIABLY
If something happens invariably, it always happens. To be invariable is to never vary. The word is sometimes used to mean frequently, which has more leeway.
COMPRISE/COMPOSE
A whole comprises its parts. The alphabet comprises 26 letters. The U.S. comprises 50 states. But people tend to say is comprised of when they mean comprise. If your instinct is to use the is … of version, then substitute composed. The whole is composed of its parts.
FREE REIN
If you have free rein you can do what you want because no one is tightening the reins.
JUST DESERTS
There is only one s in the desert of just deserts. It is not the dessert of after-dinner treats nor the dry and sandy desert. It comes from an old noun form of the verb deserve. A desert is a thing which is deserved.
TORTUOUS/TORTUROUS
Tortuous is not the same as torturous. Something that is tortuous has many twists and turns, like a winding road or a complicated argument. It’s just a description. It makes no judgment on what the experience of following that road or argument is like. Torturous, on the other hand, is a harsh judgment—“It was torture!”
EFFECT/AFFECT
When you want to talk about the influence of one thing on another, effect is the noun and affect is the verb. Weather affects crop yields. Weather has an effect on crop yields. Basically, if you can put a the or an in front of it, use effect.
EXCEPT/ACCEPT
People rarely use accept when they mean except, but often put except where they shouldn’t. To accept something is to receive, admit, or take on. To except is to exclude or leave out—“I’ll take all the flavors except orange.” The x in except is a good clue to whether you’ve got it right.
DISCREET/DISCRETE
Discreet means hush-hush or private. Discrete means separate, divided, or distinct. In discreet, the two Es are huddled together, telling secrets. In discrete, they are separated and distinguished from each other by the intervening t.
I.E./E.G.
When you add information to a sentence with parentheses, you’re more likely to need e.g., which means “for example,” than i.e., which means “in other words” or “which is to say …” An easy way to remember them is that e.g. is eg-zample and i.e. is “in effect.”
CITE/SITE
People didn’t have as much trouble with these two before websites came along and everyone started talking about sites a lot more than they used to. A site is a location or place. Cite, on the other hand, is a verb meaning to quote or reference something else. If you’re using site as a verb, it’s probably wrong.
DISINTERESTED/UNINTERESTED
People sometimes use disinterested when they really mean uninterested. To be uninterested is to be bored or indifferent to something; this is the sense most everyday matters call for. Disinterested means impartial or having no personal stake in the matter. You want a judge or referee to be disinterested, but not necessarily uninterested.
FLOUT/FLAUNT
Are you talking about showing off? Then you don’t mean flout, you mean flaunt. To flout is to ignore the rules. You can think of flaunt as the longer showier one, with that extra letter it goes around flaunting. You can flout a law, agreement, or convention, but you can flaunt almost anything.
PHASE/FAZE
Phase is the more common word and usually the right choice, except in those situations where it means “to bother.” If something doesn’t bother you, it doesn’t faze you. Faze is almost always used after a negative, so be on alert if there is an isn’t/wasn’t/doesn’t nearby.
LOATH/LOATHE
Loath is reluctant or unwilling, while to loathe is to hate. (I loathe mosquitoes), in which case you need the e on the end.
WAVE/WAIVE
When you waive your rights, or salary, or contract terms, you surrender them.
INTENSIVE PURPOSES
Intensive is a word that means strong or extreme, but that’s not what’s called for in this phrase. The phrase you want is “for all intents and purposes.”
GAUNTLET/GAMUT
Run the gauntlet and run the gamut are both correct, but mean different things. Running the gauntlet was an old type of punishment where a person was struck and beaten while running between two rows of people. A gamut is a range or spectrum. When something runs the gamut, it covers the whole range of possibilities.
PEEK/PEAK
This pair causes the most trouble in the phrase sneak peek where the spelling from sneak bleeds over to peek, causing it to switch meaning from “a quick look” to “a high point.”
FORTUITOUS
Fortuitous means by chance or accident. Because of its similarity to fortunate, it is commonly used to refer to a lucky accident, but it need not be. Having lightening strike your house and burn it down is not a lucky event, but according to your insurance company it will be covered because it is fortuitous, or unforeseen.
REFUTE
To refute a claim or an argument doesn’t just mean to offer counterclaims and opposing arguments. That would be to respond or rebut. To refute is to prove that a claim is false.
Tags:
vladibo666: (Default)
 
1. AL DESKO
A play on al fresco, which means “dining outside,” this word is perfect for the way we live now, wolfing down food at our desks while messing around on the computer.
2. MAHOOSIVE
Even bigger than massive. And it sounds that way doesn’t it? The new ginormous.
3. MAMIL
Stands for “middle aged man in Lycra” and has to do with the current cycling craze. Observe the MAMIL in his natural habitat. His bike is expensive and his outfit is way more professional than it has to be.
4. MARMITE
It’s yeasty. It’s salty. You love it or you hate it. And now it’s “used in reference to something that tends to arouse strongly positive or negative reactions rather than indifference.”
5. SHINY BUM
An Australian term for a bureaucrat or office worker. Not sure what the imagery is here. They sit so much their bums get shiny? They spend their time polishing their bums for kissing?
6. SILVERTAIL
Australian for “person who is socially prominent or displays social aspirations.”
7. SIMPLES
British word “used to convey that something is very straightforward.”
8. STICKER LICKER
How Australians refer to the person who issues parking fines.
9. THE ANT’S PANTS
This Australian version of “the bee’s knees” is the cat’s pajamas.
10. TIKI-TAKA
Term for a style of soccer play “involving highly accurate short passing and an emphasis on retaining possession of the ball.”
11. TOMOZ “Tomorrow,” which has way too many syllables, obvs.
Tags:
vladibo666: (Default)
THIS BROCHURE I'M SURE IS A REAL TREASURE & SHOULD BE READ AT LEAST WEEKLY TO BUILD YOUR SENSE OF HUMOR & THE UNDERSTANDING OF OTHER LANGUAGES AS TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH FOR YOUR BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT IS BEING CONVEYED TO YOU.

 
Brilliant Beijing Hotel Brochure - Translated as only they can.
A friend went to Beijing recently and was given this brochure by the hotel. It is precious.
She is keeping it and reading it whenever she feels depressed.
Obviously, it has been translated directly, word for word from Mandarin to English.
Read more... )

Profile

vladibo666: (Default)
vladibo666

June 2017

S M T W T F S
    123
45 6 78910
11 1213 14 1516 17
18 1920 21 222324
2526 27 282930 

Syndicate

RSS Atom
Page generated 29/6/17 05:26

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags